The First World War ended 100 years ago

BY ADAM BLACKSHAW

With 2018 marking 100 years since the end of the First World War, Anzac Day this year will surely hold additional significance for the many Australians who join together to pay tribute to and remember those who have served.

We are sharing several key Anzac Day moments from our Television News and Current Affairs Program (Newscaf), which is 30 years old this year.

The last Gallipoli veteran

Alec Campbell, the last surviving participant of the Gallipoli campaign, died of pneumonia on 16 May 2002, aged 103. With his passing, Gallipoli ceased to be a part of living memory. As the last survivor Campbell became a symbol for Australia's connection with a mythology that continues today. He was awarded numerous medals and given a state funeral in Hobart, Tasmania on 24 May 2002.

Anzac Cove centenary commemorations

Anzac Cove on the Gallipoli Peninsula has become a place of pilgrimage for many Australians. For the centenary of the landing of Australian and New Zealand troops in 2015, over 10,000 people made the trip to attend the dawn service. Speakers at the service included Prime Minister Tony Abbott and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales.

Rare Gallipoli footage

The visual record of the Gallipoli campaign is scarce, so when the Australian War Memorial discovered additional footage of Anzac Cove in 2007, shot by English war correspondent Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, it was a major find.

 

Newscaf highlights some of the significant and intriguing stories in the NFSA's television news collection that have been digitally preserved for future generations to enjoy and explore.