With the National Film Preservation Foundation

An international collaboration between the NFSA and the US National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF) has returned to the public eight American silent short films previously presumed lost. Preserved copies of the film are now available to view online with supporting scholarly research, and copies are also held in the US and Australia for screenings.

Follow the links below to view six of the rediscovered films (thumbnails courtesy US National Preservation Foundation).

The Prospector (1912)

 

Follows a familiar storyline in which the Westerner, though unschooled in human wiles, thwarts his foe and creates a new community.

View the clip and read film notes on the NFPF website »

 

 

U.S Navy of 1915 (1915)

 

Although incomplete, this documentary appears to be the longest surviving non-fiction film about the US Navy dating from before the First World War.

View the clip and read film notes on the NFPF website »

 

 

Trip Through Japan with the YWCA (c1919)

 

This fragment comes from a documentary sponsored by the YWCA to celebrate its 15th anniversary of service to Japan.

View the clip and read film notes on the NFPF website »

 

 

 

Mutt and Jeff: On Strike (1920)

 

On Strike is one of more than 300 animated ‘half-reelers’ produced between 1913 and 1926 starring the popular American comic-strip characters Mutt and Jeff.

View the clip and read film notes on the NFPF website »

 

 

The Sin Woman Trailer (1922?)

 

This ad promoting the Australian release of a 1917 American potboiler still tantalises today, although for different reasons: it teases with a glimpse of a film that can no longer be seen.

View the clip and read film notes on the NFPF website »

 

 

Pathé News, No. 15? (1922)

Actuality films capturing news and sporting events were part of the movie repertory as early as 1895 but it was not until 1909 or 1910 that Charles Pathé introduced a film compilation of the events of the day. This newsreel contains events from January and February of 1922.

View the clip and read film notes on the NFPF website »